Our Sponsors

St. Joseph Mercy Cancer Center ad
Rick Taylor realtor ad
Thrivent Financial
Roberts paint and body ad
Heydlauff's ad
Biggby's Coffee ad
Global Marketplace ad
Chelsea Chiropractic ad
Comfort Inn ad
Alan Ashley Photography ad
Chelsea Bakery ad
Chelsea State Bank ad
Lisa Allmendinger on June 30th, 2016

400x68-scoreboardlehman_line

Bulldog scoreboard results will return later this season.
Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
A scene from the dairy feeder calf show Wednesday afternoon.

A scene from the dairy feeder calf show Wednesday afternoon.

The dairy feeder calves competed in the multipurpose arena on Wednesday afternoon and among the winners were:

Heidi Fuchs – 1st place intermediate showmanship

Parker Burchett – 1st place junior showmanship

Lightweight market class – 1st place Parker Burchett

Heavyweight market class – 1st place Jordan Jedele

Grand Champion – Parker Burchett

Reserve grand champion – Jordan Jedele

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
Photo by Lisa Carolin. A scene from goat judging.

Photo by Lisa Carolin. A scene from goat judging.

By Lisa Carolin

Goats of varying sizes, colors, and breeds were represented at the Chelsea Community Fair’s goat competition Wednesday, Aug. 24.

“When it comes to showmanship, the participants are judged on how they handle and prepare the animal, composure in the ring, and knowledge of the animal,” explained Aly Rodgers, one of the superintendents along with her mom, Sue Rodgers.

Photo by Lisa Carolin.

Photo by Lisa Carolin.

The judge told the senior participants that they are the top showmen. She had a tough decision to make and told the competitors that giving her more eye contact and looking like they were having fun were helpful components.

Kara O’Day won the Grand Champion market goat and Shelby Williams got reserve champion goat.

Cameron O’Day won rate of gain.

Faith Olberg won the grand champion vote for overall winner of all goat breeds.

Andrea Loucks was the winner of senior showmanship and will go on to sweepstakes Saturday night when all the senior winners from the various species will compete for the grand prize.

The other showmanship winners were Rebecca Rabideau in the intermediate category, Jonathan Rombyer in the junior show, and Brandon Rombyer in the novice category.

The goat show ended with a fun class for anyone who wanted the opportunity to show. There were 10 participants, including three adults, and everyone had the chance to show goats that had been in the show.

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
File photo. Last year's Jr. homemaker and runner up and the Homemaker of the Year and runner up.

File photo. Last year’s Jr. homemaker and runner up and the Homemaker of the Year and runner up.

(Publisher’s note: Thursday’s events published yesterday.)

One of the most anticipated events of the Chelsea Community Fair is Ladies Day on Friday, Aug. 26. So mark the date, be sure to set your alarm, and get ready for a fun morning.

Gates open at 7 a.m. and registration is at 7:45 a.m. The program runs from 8:30-10:30 a.m.

Mary Tobin, Ladies Day superintendent, says that “insiders” know that they need to be in line well before registration time. In fact, the earlier the better, as the first 300 registrants (18 years and older) get goodie bags filled with lots of surprises.

When you get there, have an address label in hand to save time registering for a chance to win fabulous door prizes donated by a local merchants and businesses. The morning is filled with complimentary refreshments, entertainment, a fashion show and lots of laughter and fun.

Planned are: Studio 3 Performing Arts Center dancers,Rob Crozier, musician performing jazz, vintage pop, and Americana music, 325 goodie bags and more than 150 door prizes.

Coffee provided by Catered Coffee, juice provided by Thompson’s, muffins provided by sponsorship funds

If this will be your first time, Tobin promises you’ll be hooked — and it won’t be your last.

From 4-10 p.m., you’ll find bingo taking place at the Knight’s of Columbus tent and Colors the Clown performs from 3-7 p.m.

If it’s tractor pulling that you enjoy, farm stock, speed-pull weight transfer sled classes begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Main Arena.

The horse show takes place all day and you can wander through the Merchant Barn and the Nature’s Creation of Life barn as well.

Rides open at 1 p.m.

Tags:

Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
A scene from Tuesday night's demo derby at the Chelsea Community Fair.

Photo by Burrill Strong. A scene from Tuesday night’s demo derby at the Chelsea Community Fair.

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Burrill Strong for the photos in this slideshow.)

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
Photo by Crystal Hayduk. Everyone loves fair food.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. Everyone loves fair food.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

By Crystal Hayduk

Food is a necessity of life, and that’s probably why people gravitate to their favorite fair foods every August during the Chelsea Community Fair.

With a wide variety of food and treats available, nobody needs to settle on just one, either. Throughout the week, I like to sample several of my annual favorites – Kiwanis dogs, elephant ears, and French fries dripping with malt vinegar to name just a few.

When the fair opened on Tuesday evening, I walked from one end to the other, visiting each place that offered food and chatting with fairgoers about their favorites. Here are some of the results of my informal poll:

Cotton candy and caramel apples with nuts are the most popular treat items sold on the midway.

The fair is reported to be one of the best places to get a corn dog.

Chelsea Fair’s own ice cream shack offers what many people said is one of the best food bargains at $3 for a generous serving of ice cream and $4 for a milkshake. Seven flavors are available, and favorite flavors seem to be related to age – children prefer Superman, young adults often order Moose Tracks, and older adults love butter pecan. (Related story http://chelseaupdate.com/2016-chelsea-community-fair-check-new-ice-cream-shack/)

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

Many people who buy food on the midway also purchase food from the Kiwanis hot dog, Amie Jo’s elephant ears, and Rotary beverage trailers located near the main arena. Not only do they offer delicious food, but it’s widely recognized that the money spent there is returned to the community. (Related story http://chelseaupdate.com/2016-chelsea-community-fair-kiwanis-club-lowers-prices-popular-items-hotdog-truck/)

Nine picnic tables are shaded by a canopy tent this year, thanks to Ron Livengood and Chelsea Hearth and Fireplaces.

The Chelsea Fair restaurant in the service center (I’ve always affectionately called it the fair kitchen) offers meals all day beginning with breakfast at 7 a.m. Items can be purchased a la carte at a reasonable price. With dinner specials that include an entrée, vegetable, salad, and bread, it really is possible to eat a nutritionally balanced meal at the fair. (And the air conditioning in the service center on a hot day is a plus.) (Related story http://chelseaupdate.com/2016-chelsea-community-fair-ginny-shelley-wheaton-will-favorite-food-service-center/)

Kristy Fetyko, whose husband had gone in search of a corn dog, sat in the gazebo eating a slice of pizza. “This doesn’t hold a candle to Thompson’s, but you’ve got to do it once a year.”

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

The line was long on the midway as many fairgoers waited to order a bucket of fries. Aaron Duykers and Noah Lee admitted that a lot of the midway concessions seem overpriced, but the $8 bucket of fries is the perfect size for sharing and can be refilled for $4. Giving a nod to their artistic side and the influence of their teachers at Chelsea High School, they came up with an impromptu Haiku. “Chicken on a stick, what a beautiful purchase. It needs some ketchup.”

For my first evening at the 2016 Chelsea Fair, I tried the Kiwanis knockwurst and sauerkraut, which Bob Milbrodt, Kiwanis treasurer, had told me was the most popular item served. Called a “one with” by the Kiwanis volunteers, and smothered in their secret recipe sauerkraut, it really was mouthwateringly delicious.

Milbrodt said that the Kiwanis group can earn $60,000 in a good fair year, and all of that money is used to support dozens of local organizations and activities. Weather is their biggest concern and potential detriment to their most important fundraising of the year.  “So if it rains, bring the rain gear and come anyway,” said Milbrodt.

You may see me at the fair this week – possibly wandering the grounds sharing one of Amie Jo’s elephant ears with my daughters, or at the demolition derby sharing fries with my husband, or having an early dinner at the service center, catching up on my daily recommended servings of vegetables. Let me know what your favorite fair foods are.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. The new ice cream shack at the Chelsea Community Fair is a big hit.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. The new ice cream shack at the Chelsea Community Fair is a big hit.

 

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 25th, 2016
Mason Trinkle, senior showmanship winner.

Photo by Lisa Carolin. Mason Trinkle, senior showmanship winner.

Photo by Lisa Carolin. Amanda Breuninger's grand champion pigs.

Photo by Lisa Carolin.

By Lisa Carolin

The Multi-Purpose Arena at the 79th Annual Chelsea Community Fair was nicknamed Hog Heaven on Tuesday night, August 23. That’s when the judging of the swine took place.

There were 42 pens of pigs for a total of 83 pigs.

“We’re looking for how well the kids present to the judge, the kids’ appearance, the pigs’ appearance, and how well they keep the pig in front of the judge,” explained Superintendent Joel Powers.

It took several hours to get through all the age groups, but when it was all over, Amanda Breuninger and her hog were the champion, and Reid Schneider and his hog were the reserve champion.

Photo by Lisa Carolin.

Photo by Lisa Carolin.

Carter Trinkle was awarded the champion pen, and Logan Powers the reserve champion pen.

The showmanship winners were Mason Trinkle in the senior show, Emily Trinkle in the intermediate show, Carter Trinkle in the junior show, and Sadie McCalla in the youth show.

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 24th, 2016

 

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. Beach teachers 2016: (left to right) Beach Assistant Principal Matthew Ceo, Alex Stacy, Beach Principal Nick Angel, Frederik Van Reesema, and Kevin Tykoski.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. Beach teachers 2016: (left to right) Beach Assistant Principal Matthew Ceo, Alex Stacy, Beach Principal Nick Angel, Frederik Van Reesema, and Kevin Tykoski.

By Crystal Hayduk

Concerned community members attended the regular meeting of the Chelsea School District Board of Education on Aug. 22, which was conducted by Vice-President Laurel McDevitt in the absence of board president, Steve Olsen.

At the first opportunity for public input, Karen Findlay updated the board regarding Beach Middle School’s robotics team. The group is the recipient of grants that will permit the building of “more challenging robots.” The first parent/student meeting will be held on Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. at Beach.

The high school parent/student meeting will be held on Sept.15 at 7 p.m. at Chelsea High School (CHS). Findlay said that early meetings are traditional because the robotics season begins at the start of the school year.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. North Creek teachers 2016: (left to right) Marie Larson, Michelle Mavian, Andrea Ryba, Stacy Rehmann, and North Creek Principal Luman Strong.

Photo by Crystal Hayduk. North Creek teachers 2016: (left to right) Marie Larson, Michelle Mavian, Andrea Ryba, Stacy Rehmann, and North Creek Principal Luman Strong.

Findlay spoke about the Aug. 11 death of 2016 graduate Jared Franklin. She said, “On a sadder note, we lost Jared. Jared was an active and energetic member of the robotics team. We appreciate the school’s response, and providing support to the students. The team is still in shock.”

Findlay said that the team has decided to pursue the mission of education, awareness, and prevention of suicide at the local, state, and national level.

Findlay also informed the board that the grassroots group, Chelsea Community Cares, met on Aug. 21. She said that the meeting became a forum looking at the mental health needs of youth, with the related topics of bullying, substance use, suicide, and general mental health issues.

Findlay shared three ideas: establishing a Mental Wellness Day throughout the district to provide information to the students, in coordination with the District Wellness Committee; printing hotline phone numbers on student IDs, and working with the district to help students with generalized anxiety and stress.

Community member Shauna Mote addressed the board as a former district employee of 10 years and a parent with children in the district for 26 years. She said that the issues facing the district’s youth lately are not new.

“They have been around since my oldest started school and before that,” said Mote. She suggested that entities branch out and do research before “… coming back together and putting things together like a puzzle piece.”

Citing personal examples, Mote said, “It does take a village, and it’s going to take all of us to try and help our youth.” She encouraged the school to do what they can, and to embrace all who want to be involved. “Let’s put something together that really can work going forward,” she said.

Superintendent Julie Helber said, “Our hearts go out to Jared’s family and Samantha’s (Gillman) family. This does shake up the community.”

Helber said that the district will be looking closely at next steps for support and prevention. The District Wellness Committee looks at a number of issues, including safety, crisis, first responders, and bullying. “We’re not mental health professionals, but we see students every day; and we can be a point of referral,” said Helber.

Principals introduced their newest staff members to the board. New North Creek Principal Luman Strong welcomed Michelle Mavian, a teacher consultant who “will make a huge impression with our students”; Andrea Ryba, a speech pathologist whose duties will be split between North Creek and the high school; Stacy Rehmann, who will be teaching kindergarten after 11 years of experience with third and fourth graders in the Stockbridge School District; and Marie Larson, a second grade teacher who is also a pianist and “will bring music to her classroom.”

South Meadows Principal Stacie Battaglia introduced third grade teacher Jaime Schramm, a University of Michigan honors graduate who comes from a family of educators. “She has lots of energy and excitement,” said Battaglia.

Beach Middle School Principal Nick Angel introduced Alex Stacy, who will teach eighth grade. “He’s one of the best young teachers I know,” said Angel. Frederik van Reesema joins the Beach team as a social worker. He interned with Beth Morris, and Angel described him as “creative.” Kevin Tykoski, who will teach sixth grade math and science, is “already hard at work.” Joining the administrative team as assistant principal from Saline is Matthew Ceo.

In other board news:

  • The board approved a resolution to support the Chelsea Community Center Committee.
  • The board also approved the appointment of CHS parent Chasidy Federoff to serve on the Washtenaw Intermediate School District’s Parent Advisory Council for a two-year term.

Upcoming dates:

  • The first day of school for teachers is Aug. 30.
  • The first day of school for students is Sept. 6.
  • The next school board meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 12 in the board room at the Washington Street Education Center (WSEC).
  • Photo by Crystal Hayduk.

    Photo by Crystal Hayduk.South Meadows teacher 2016: (left to right) Jaime Schramm with South Meadows Principal Stacie Battaglia.

Tags:

Lisa Allmendinger on August 24th, 2016
Dairy cattle show at 10 a.m. Thursday.

Dairy cattle show at 10 a.m. Thursday.

(Publisher’s note: Wednesday’s events ran yesterday.)

Ah, the dairy cattle … one of my favorite livestock at the Chelsea Community Fair, will center stage on Thursday, Aug. 25, beginning at 10 a.m. in the Multipurpose Arena.

Gates open at 10 a.m. and the rides begin at 1 p.m. Plus, it’s senior day, which means free admission for those 65 and older.

File photo. Reserve Grand Champion steer owned by MacKenzie Schneider weighed 1.369 pounds and was purchased by Rick Taylor-Reinhart Company for $7.50 per pound.

File photo. Reserve Grand Champion steer owned by MacKenzie Schneider weighed 1.369 pounds and was purchased by Rick Taylor-Reinhart Company for $7.50 per pound.

A draft pull will take place in the Main Arena beginning at 11 a.m. to be followed by a kiddie peddle-power tractor pull in the Multipurpose covered arena at 1 p.m.

The horse show takes place all day as well.

Thursday night is a big evening for all the youth who have shown their livestock in the fair – it’s the livestock auction in the Multipurpose Arena, which begins at 7 p.m.

At 7:30 p.m., a diesel truck pull will take place in the Main Arena.

File photo. Grand Champion pig, owned by Jack McCalla weighed 270 pounds and was purchased by Lehman and Schaeffler Real Estate Services for $5.25 per pound.

File photo. Grand Champion pig, owned by Jack McCalla weighed 270 pounds and was purchased by Lehman and Schaeffler Real Estate Services for $5.25 per pound.

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 24th, 2016

Chelsea Police logo 2In this week’s Chelsea Police blotter, a resident alerted police of possible problem with 44-year-old Chelsea woman parked in a parking lot and police subsequently arrested her for a DUI.

For the full story, please click here.

 

Tags: ,

Lisa Allmendinger on August 24th, 2016

8.30&31,9.1-3-Day-PSAT-Workshop-LCD

To register for this workshop or to learn more about additional events at the Chelsea District Library, please click here.

Tags: