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Lisa Allmendinger on February 28th, 2015

Story and slide show By Crystal Hayduk

Students in kindergarten through fifth grade were treated to “Teacher Olympics” at South Meadows on Feb. 26 to officially end the fifth annual fruit and veggie challenge.

Throughout the month of February, students at both elementary schools have kept track of their fruit and vegetable intake. In an effort to promote healthier lifestyles through eating wholesome foods and increasing physical activity, teachers set a building-wide goal for the number of fruit and vegetables servings for students to consume during the school day.

“Both schools came up a bit short of our original goals,” said South Meadows’ principal Stacie Battaglia. Dressed as a tomato and wearing a gigantic white glove, she held up four stout fingers to demonstrate the number of February school days lost to snow or cold temperatures as a primary reason for not reaching the goal. “But, we surpassed our revised goal, eating 8,095 servings,” she said, as South’s students cheered.

Not to be outdone, North’s students cheered when Principal Marcus Kaemming, dressed as a bunch of grapes, announced that his kindergarten through second graders had eaten 12,000 servings.

Traveling to South Meadows by bus to watch their teachers compete is a favorite outing for North Creek students. Kindergarten students were awed by their first glimpse of the huge gymnasium housed in their future school and the noise created by hundreds of spirited students excited to host the games.

Much like any sporting event, upbeat music was played prior to the start of the event. Teachers warmed up in preparation for their athletic feats, while enthusiastic spectators rooted for their favorites.

A new addition to this year’s entertainment was a video of Kaemming and Battaglia in the aisles of Polly’s Country Market, dressed in their grape and tomato costumes, to demonstrate that shopping for healthy foods can be fun.

Teachers competed in athletic and food-themed games, including shooting baskets, fruit and veggie catch, cantaloupe bowling, hula hoop pass, and the fruit and spoon relay.

“What a wonderful celebration of healthy choices,” said Dana Emmert, school board member and parent who attended the event. “The principals, Stacie Battaglia and Marcus Kaemming, along with all of the staff from our schools did an amazing job and provided a really positive experience for the students.

Chelsea pride was apparent in all of the smiling faces.

“I had so much fun being a witness to just one of the many fantastic ways our teachers go above and beyond for our children,” she said.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 28th, 2015

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Bob Milbrodt for the information in this story.)

The Kiwanis Club of Chelsea, in its 91st year, holds a weekly meeting on Monday nights at 6:15 p.m. in the St. Joseph Mercy-Chelsea cafeteria.

This week’s speaker will be Lisa Nickel from Chelsea School District. She is director of Early Childhood Education, who will speak about the programs offered in Chelsea. Our club has been supporting scholarships for financially needy students, and will also look with her for other ways to assist in the development of our community’s youngest citizens.

It is a prime goal of the Kiwanis club to serve the children of Chelsea.

The speaker typically begins at 6:45 p.m.  and everyone is invited to the meeting to learn about Kiwanis.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 28th, 2015

(Chelsea Update would like to thank coach Brittany Sleicher for the information in this story.)

The 8th grade gold basketball team is now 9-1 after defeating Ypsilanti 21-11 Thursday night.

This game was one of the most exciting games yet, and two girls who hadn’t scored this season both did in this contest.

Caitlin Dusenbury scored three points, Jenna Fosdick had six, Madeleine Kennedy scored four points, Peyton Lajiness had five points, three of her points were awesome, nothing-but-net three pointers.

Mallory Stribe had four points, Brittney Stephenson had four points, and Emily Strzyzewski drove to the basket for two points.
The season ends Monday away at Tecumseh.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 28th, 2015

Chelsea Senior Center logo

The Chelsea Area Senior Center is partnering with Therapaws of Michigan to bring therapy dogs to the senior center on the first and third Wednesdays of each month from 2-4 p.m. The dog first visit is on March 4.

If you play an instrument and/or sing and/or would like to see music-related programming at the senior center, stop by Thursday, March 19 from 2:30 to 4 p.m. for a jam session.

Join senior center members for a happy hour at the Chelsea Alehouse on Friday, March 27 from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 28th, 2015

BowenTony02aMichael Anthony “Tony” Bowen of Chelsea, age 77, died peacefully Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 after a long brave battle.

He died in his home surrounded by his family and with his pastor at his side. He was born Aug. 10, 1937 in Belmont, North Carolina, the son of George Alexander and Katie Frances (Featherstone) Bowen.

Tony grew up in Belmont, NC, attended college in Ft Wayne, IN, and has lived in Chelsea since 1960.  Tony loved his family. He loved golfing, fishing, and canoeing.  His hobby was carving Santa Clauses. Tony was a member of St. Paul United Church of Christ.

He retired from Chrysler Corporation as an Engineering Manager. Tony was a long-time member of the Inverness Country Club, President of St. Paul United Church of Christ for many years, long-time member of JC’s, and past President of the Chelsea Recreation Department.

For the full obituary, please click here.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 27th, 2015

Chelsea-School-District-logo

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Kristin Krarup-Joyce, Ed. S. NCSP, Ellen Kent, Ed. S. NCSP and Emily Verbeke, Ed. S. NCSP for the information in this weekly column. If you have a question for one of the school psychologists, please email asktheschoolpsychologist@gmail.com. All information will be kept confidential.)

Life is so busy these days. We are always on the go – and plugged- in. Instead of looking at the clouds while waiting for the kids to get off the bus, we click through other people’s vacation pictures. Our children rarely just lie down and think.

According to Peter Toohey, a professor at the University of Calgary in Alberta and author of Boredom: A Lively History, “boredom makes us look inward. It creates a fertile state for creativity and self-awareness …”

Teresa Belton, Ph.D., a researcher in the School of Education and Lifelong Learning at the University of Anglia in England, notes that those times when we are bored spur us into creativity. She notes that many artists and authors credit tedium as a source of inspiration. (Please see the full article in February’s “Real Simple” for an interesting study.)

Laura Markham, Ph.D., finds that today’s culture, which often rushes kids from one adult-led activity to another, has resulted in a generation with higher anxiety.

Other psychologists note that children need unstructured time to explore their imaginations.

Rather than rush to find a solution the next time your child complains that she is bored, try one of these approaches:

Figure out what “I’m bored” means. It could mean that your child wants your undivided attention. Stop and focus on him, and him only, for five minutes. Or, it could mean something else entirely. “I’m bored” in math class could be your son’s way of saving face when he doesn’t understand the material.

Resign as cruise director; become coach. Help your child brainstorm a list of things to do. Then, ask her which one she thinks would be fun to do. Step back and let her decide what to do. Remember, it’s not your job to play, too. Keep the list on the refrigerator for the next time she is bored.

Make transitional periods distraction-free. Let them just gaze out the window on short car rides – no phones or devices for trips under 10 or 15 minutes.

Dare to let yourself be bored. Resist checking your cell phone when waiting to pick up your child from a sports practice. Use mundane tasks (like washing dishes or peeling potatoes) as time to let your mind structure that important memo or decorate that birthday cake. Finally, when you are alone in a coffee shop, try not to sit hunched over your device. “Sit up straight. Smile. Breathe deeply. Emanate an aura of contentment.”

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 27th, 2015

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Cathy Kattula-Klink for the information in this story.)

The Chelsea High School Class of 1995 is celebrating its 20th reunion this year and the planning committee is trying to find the addresses of all their classmates.

Please email your name and home address to chelseahigh95@gmail.com.

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CDL logo-1(Chelsea Update would like to thank Chelsea District Library staff for the information in this story.)

The Chelsea District Library will hold its 6th annual Authors in Chelsea event on March 25-26.This two-day event, which brings three nationally known authors to present workshops on writing in Chelsea schools, is unique this year as all three authors are from Michigan.

The library is also holding a special evening event on March 25 from 6:30-8 p.m. for everyone to meet the authors and get books signed.

“Our evening event has become so popular that we can no longer fit everyone in our McKune Room,” said Karen Persello, head of Youth and Teen Services in a press release.

“To accommodate the larger audience, we are moving it to Room 100 of the Washington Street Education Center located on 512 Washington St.” Books will be available for purchase in the library lobby, courtesy of Chelsea’s Just Imagine bookstore.

This year’s line-up includes Nancy Shaw (North Creek Elementary), creator of the infectious characters of Sheep in a Jeep fame and author of several other rhyming stories, including Sheep on a Ship and Raccoon Tune. Johnathan Rand (South Meadows Elementary), is author of the incredibly popular book series, Michigan Chillers, American Chillers, and Freddie Fernortner, Fearless First Grader, and Gary Schmidt (Beach Middle School), author and recipient of a Newbery Honor and a Printz Honor awards for his novel Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy, and a Newbery Honor award for his novel The Wednesday Wars.

Authors in Chelsea brings nationally known authors and illustrators to Chelsea schools, providing children close contact with award-winning authors and illustrators to explore the art and craft of writing and illustrating, and encouraging students to read and appreciate literature.

Through the generous support of our sponsors, this year’s program has once again expanded to include the 3rd grade, raising the number of students in the program from 850 to 1,000. Now all students in grades 1 through 6 will benefit from the program.

“We are very excited about our continued opportunity to have the Authors Visits,” said Marcus Kaemming, principal of North Creek Elementary School in a press release.

“The children are extremely excited about the books and experiences they bring.,” he said, adding, “Each year the authors spur new conversations and help our students get reinvigorated about their own writing. The CDL does a superb job of finding great people to share with our youngest authors.”

South Meadows Elementary School Principal Stacie Battaglia said, “We are so very fortunate that our library finds value in offering these experiences to our students.”

“There is such excitement and of course an amazing learning opportunity for kids when they meet a “real” author,” she said, adding, “To have one of their favorites this year, Johnathan Rand, is astounding, and we are extremely excited to welcome him to South Meadows.”

In preparation for Authors in Chelsea, youth librarians will visit each school to get students excited about this year’s authors.Additionally, they will hold a Fun Fair on Saturday, March 7, 1:30-3:30 p.m. where kids can join together in fun and games themed around this year’s authors’ books.

Activities will range from hiking through the library in search of sheep like the ones in Shaw’s books, to creating creepy monsters based on local Michigan towns such as the ones in Rand’s popular Michigan Chillers series, to celebrating Schmidt’s novel The Wednesday Wars with a Shakespearean insult station, music trivia and more.  Ages 6 and up are invited to attend and registration is not required – just drop-in.

For further information about the Authors in Chelsea program, please click here.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 27th, 2015
Chelsea Lion Paul Weber thanks Amy Heydlauff for talking to the Lions about the Chelsea Area Wellness Foundation.

Chelsea Lion Paul Weber thanks Amy Heydlauff for talking to the Lions about the Chelsea Area Wellness Foundation.

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Keith Bloomensaat for these photos.)

 

Chelsea Lion Paul Weber thanks Chelsea Police Officer Richard Kinsey for giving the club a very informative talk about his experiences as a police officer for more than 30 years.

Chelsea Lion Paul Weber thanks Chelsea Police Officer Richard Kinsey for giving the club a very informative talk about his experiences as a police officer for more than 30 years.

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Lisa Allmendinger on February 27th, 2015

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Trinh Pifer for the information in this story.)

Learn about the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan and find out ways you can support local non-profits, like the Chelsea Senior Center, through planned giving.

The program will take place on Wednesday, March 4 at 1 p.m. at the Chelsea Senior Center on the Washington Street Education Center campus.

The program is free and refreshments will be provided. Please call 734-475-9242 to register.

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