Our Sponsors

Lehman ad

Our Sponsors

Discovery Center ad

Our Sponsors

Chelsea Farmers' Market ad

Our Sponsors

Our Sponsors

Our Sponsors

Inverness Country Club ad

Our Sponsors

Mark Bogarin Photography ad

Our Sponsors

Our Family Farm LLC ad

Our Sponsors

Burrill Strong Photography

Our Sponsors

Heydlauff's ad

Our Sponsors

Silver Maples ad
Chelsea State Bank ad
Lisa Allmendinger on August 17th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information and photos in this column.) This past winter was one that most of us would like to forget, but in one way it was not very different from others.  Save for the calling of blue jays and crows, [...]

Continue reading about Summer’s Last Nester the American Goldfinch

Lisa Allmendinger on August 10th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information and photos in this story.) In the 1960’s, early in my career as park interpreter (naturalist) for Waterloo Recreation Area, I was assigned the task of researching an old grist mill and pond along Trist Creek. The purpose [...]

Continue reading about A History of Trist: A Little Town That Is No More

Lisa Allmendinger on August 3rd, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the photos and information in this column.) There are only about 150 people in the U.S. and Canada who are authorized to band hummingbirds.  Master bird bander Allen Chartier is just one of three licensed in Michigan. The Federal Bird [...]

Continue reading about Local Banding Program Uncovers Hummingbird Secrets

Lisa Allmendinger on July 27th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information and photos in this column.) Over 300 bird species visit or reside in Michigan every year, but none are more interesting or unique than the diminutive ruby-throated hummingbird. This, the smallest bird nesting east of the Rocky Mountains, [...]

Continue reading about The High Energy Hummer, a Backyard Delight

Lisa Allmendinger on July 20th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information and photos in this column.) Take the time to canoe, kayak or fish in the shallows of area lakes that still have some natural shoreline, and you will be rewarded with some of nature’s most beautiful and interesting [...]

Continue reading about The Wild World of Water Lilies

Lisa Allmendinger on July 6th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information and photos in this column. This is the third and last part of the series. Part I can be found here and Part II can be found here.) As we continue our journey through Waterloo’s past, it’s important [...]

Continue reading about Waterloo: Tales from the past, part III

Lisa Allmendinger on June 29th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the information in this column) A change in the making … At the turn of the last century Waterloo began attracting vacationers. General storekeeper Lynn Gorton advertised the resort advantages of Waterloo, as well as the benefit of shopping at [...]

Continue reading about Waterloo: Tales from the Past, part II

Lisa Allmendinger on June 22nd, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Natural History Association for the photos and information in this column.) The topography of the Waterloo Area and surroundings was formed by the convergence of three large lobes of the last glacier some 10,000 years ago. One lobe approached from east (the Erie lobe) [...]

Continue reading about Waterloo: Tales from the past part I

Lisa Allmendinger on June 15th, 2014

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Tom Hodgson and the Waterloo Area Historical Association for the information in this story.) The first settlers to arrive in the Chelsea area found it to be a very different place than we see today. Water levels were 4-6 feet higher and so much of the area was covered [...]

Continue reading about Portage River reverting to a wild state