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1 case of measles confirmed in Washtenaw County

(Chelsea Update would like to thank Susan Ringler-Cerniglia for the information in this story.)

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed one case of measles in Washtenaw County as of April 8.

Washtenaw County Health Department is providing additional information to local residents because of potential exposure to measles in public areas. Measles is very contagious, potentially serious and vaccine preventable.

Everyone is encouraged to check and update their measles vaccination, if needed. Anyone at any of the following Washtenaw County locations during the dates and times provided should monitor themselves for rash with fever or other symptoms consistent with measles for 21 days.

If you suspect measles, seek immediate medical treatment. Residents are urged to call their doctor or emergency room before arriving so they can take precautions to prevent exposure to other individuals. Please do not contact the businesses listed below for information.

Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor, 2935 Birch Hollow Drive on April 1-4 and April 8 from 7:45 am to 6:30 pm. This includes families using the daycare program or individuals entering or exiting the facility.

Olive Garden Italian Kitchen, 445 Eisenhower Parkway on April 1 from 5 to 7 pm.

Liberty Athletic Club, 2975 W. Liberty Road on April 7 from 1 to 3:45 pm. This includes individuals entering and exiting the facility and anyone using the pool or family locker room during the specified time.

Vaccine given within 72 hours of exposure can prevent illness. Immune globulin (Ig) treatment is effective within six days of exposure for high-risk individuals. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine if immune globulin is right for you. You cannot get measles from the vaccine.

Because measles can be spread through the air by an infected person, Washtenaw County Health Department is alerting the public to the potential exposures. A person with measles is contagious for four days before and four days after the rash appears. An individual who was in the same location up to two hours after an individual contagious with measles is considered potentially exposed.

Having two doses of MMR vaccine at least 28 days apart is fully protective. Having only one dose of MMR vaccine is approximately 93 percent protective. The first dose is routinely given to children after their first birthday. Vaccination is not necessary if an individual has a prior history of measles illness. Individuals born before 1957 are assumed to have natural immunity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The MMR vaccine is available through primary health care providers and at some local pharmacies. Individuals should contact their health care provider for advice. Washtenaw County Health Department is offering the MMR vaccine Wednesday, April 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. Or call 734-544-6700 to schedule an appointment.

Visit www.washtenaw.org/health for any updates.

Measles

Measles (rubeola) is an extremely contagious disease caused by the measles virus. Measles can cause complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Measles can also cause miscarriages or premature delivery in pregnant women.

Symptoms

The illness starts with a runny nose, red eyes, cough, fever and sore throat. Tiny white spots may appear in the mouth. A raised, red rash appears on the third to fifth day of illness. The rash typically starts on the face and spreads down the body and out to the arms and legs. The rash usually lasts four to seven days. Symptoms start seven to 14 days after being exposed to measles, and last one to two weeks.

How is it spread?

Droplets from the nose or mouth, through sneezing, coughing or speaking, spread measles.

A person with measles is contagious for four days before and four days after the rash appears.

Reliable Measles Information

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services www.Michigan.gov/MeaslesOutbreak

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) https://www.cdc.gov/measles/

 

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